Another teaching on parenting, but this time from the perspective of the kids.

Children have such power of their parents, but not necessarily in the way a child or adolescent thinks they do. Our lives as parents are tied to our children’s. We want our children to be healthy and well, and to be our friends through life. We want them to be godly, and God-followers. When children make foolish mistakes or immoral choices, it tears the parents’ hearts out. Sometimes it’s the parents’ fault, but sometimes it’s not. But we can help each other as parents when we see a family falling apart.

This proverb teaches that kids should reflect on what they are doing to their parents. What kind of emotions do his or her actions, speech, and character bring forth from the parents? As we mentioned before, the verse clearly assumes that the parents are wise and godly themselves, because if they weren’t, they might be happy at their children’s unrighteous behavior. Wise parents, in contrast, would be encouraged by good behavior and saddened by the bad. But the proverb also serves as motivation to kids. Those who love their parents and want to be godly should be motivated to embrace righteousness and godliness and bring joy to their parents.

You know, our culture is all against this. On TV shows, the parents are always the stupid ones. In school (or at the mall), kids are laughed at if they like their parents, like to hang out with them, and obey them. Have you noticed? The pressure is to reject parents, and to treat them like idiots. But that’s not God’s way, kids. No, your parents aren’t perfect, but if they’re trying to be godly and raise their kids to be godly, then the kids have an obligation too: to follow their lead, respect their authority, and honor them.

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